Rock of Ages or Age of Rocks – How Old is Ulster?

IGA LECTURE

Dublin – Wednesday 14th May 2014

Dr. Garth Earls will present a lecture:

  Rock of Ages or Age of Rocks – How Old is Ulster?

Venue:

Dublin – GSI, Beggars Bush, Haddington Road, Dublin 2.

Time:

Dublin – Tea/ Coffee & Chats – 6:00pm
Lecture – 6:30pm

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IRETHERM: Ireland’s geothermal energy potential assessment project

IGA LECTURE

Dublin – Wednesday 7th May 2014

Prof. Alan Jones (DIAS) will present a lecture:

 IRETHERM: Ireland’s geothermal energy potential assessment project

Venue:

Dublin – GSI, Beggars Bush, Haddington Road, Dublin 2.

Time:

Wednesday May 7th – 6:00pm

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IGA LECTURE

Galway – Tuesday 1st April, 2014

Dublin – Wednesday 2nd April, 2014 

Ray Scanlon (GSI) will present a lecture:

 The Tellus Border Project

VENUE: 

Galway - TBC 

Dublin - GSI, Beggars Bush, Haddington Road, Dublin 2.

TIME:

Dublin – Tea/ Coffee & Chats – 6:00pm, Lecture – 6:30pm

Galway - Lecture – 6:00pm

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IGA Lecture with Gerry Stanley (GSI)

IGA LECTURE

Dublin – Wednesday 5th February 2014
Cork – Wednesday 12th February 2014

Gerry Stanley (GSI) will present a lecture:

Ireland’s Historic Mine Sites

Venue:

Dublin – GSI, Beggars Bush, Haddington Road, Dublin 2.

Cork – Ted Nevill Laboratory, Cork Enterprise Centre, North mall, Cork.

Time:

Dublin – Tea/ Coffee & Chats – 6:00pm
Lecture – 6:30pm

Cork – Lecture – 6:00pm

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IGA Lecture with Dr. Dave Chew (TCD)

IGA LECTURE!

Galway – Tuesday 29th October, 2013
 Dublin – Tuesday 5th November, 2013

Dr. Dave Chew (TCD) will present a lecture:

Measuring time in Palaeozoic sedimentary sequences by geochronology

VENUE: Galway – University College Galway

 Dublin – TBC 

 TIME:  6:30pm

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An informal talk offered to the IGA by Barry Long

 Wednesday 13th of November in Dublin & Wednesday 20th November in Cork

CLIMATE CHANGE: THE CURRANT BUN* AND OTHER PLAYERS

An informal talk with facts, falsehoods, speculations and uncertainties

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) asserts that humans are causing global temperature to rise by increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) through the use of fossil fuels.  The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reiterates this IPCC teaching.  Should we believe the IPCC or not?  As a geologist I believe that climate is always changing naturally, influenced by various causes.  During the last 4 years, as time permitted, I felt the need to reach my own conclusions on climate change, once referred to as global warming and now as extreme climate.  Although my ongoing reading has led me to the Sun, other factors have also become apparent.  The Sun and other climate drivers are either ignored or dismissed by the IPCC as insignificant.

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Cloghleagh Iron-Maganese Depsit & Ireland’s “Youngest” Fault!

Cloghleagh_s

Saturday 31st August, 2013

Led by Dr David Jordon & George Reynolds

The Cloghleagh iron-manganese deposit was a trial mine – only an adit and a few filled-in trial shafts remain – and it is set apart from Ballycorus lead mines. It is located in the Upper Liffey pluton, a subsidiary to the Leinster batholith which was described by Prof. James Brindley. The mineralisation is hypogenetic, iron and manganese oxides in the matrix of an explosion breccia; the responsible fault plane from which can be seen as well as examples of goethite, a hydrated iron oxide and psilomelane and hollandite (K-Ba varieties of pyrolusite -manganese dioxide). The mine was worked from 1862 to 1868 and parts of a stone crushing wheel which was never assembled can be seen. The fault zone is dated at 12 million years, and claims to be Ireland’s “youngest” fault.
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The Leinster Granite: A Beginner’s Guide

Wicklow

28th April, 2013

This field trip is primarily aimed at beginners, amateurs and others who might not have encountered granite before or the geology of South Dublin(/North Wicklow). It might serve as an introduction to Peadar McArdle’s field trip to the Blackstairs granite this coming May. My trip will visit just two locations to examine the basics of what granite is, the rocks that are associated with granite proper (aplites, pegmatites, quartz veins), and a local sample of a rock type that the Leinster granite itself intrudes (andalusite schist). By good fortune, both stops are ‘beauty spots’, so if the weather is kind, everyone should bring their cameras. Both locations require only short walks on paved paths. However, the paths are somewhat steepish in parts. Bring appropriate footwear and wet weather gear, just in case. Finally, because parking at the first stop in Killiney can be quite problematic at weekends, I am starting the field trip at the early time of 9:30 am. Other than that, the day’s timings will be relatively relaxed. Anyway, the first stop at White Rock can quickly fill up with nudists, and we want to get there first!

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“Can Fracking Cause Earthquakes?”

LECTURE!

 

Thursday 18th April, 2013

Lecturer: Mairéad Nic Bhloscaidh (University of Ulster)

Tea/Coffee from 7:00pm

Lecture commencing at 7:30pm

Venue: Geological Survey of Ireland, Beggars Bush, Haddington Road, Dublin 4

Technologies such as Hydraulic Fracturing or Carbon Capture and Storage, which involve the injection of fluid into the earth’s crust, have been associated with increased rates of seismicity. One issue of concern in assessing the risks associated with these technologies is the possible magnitude of the induced earthquakes; although most of the observed earthquakes are small, there are cases where fluid injection has been linked to the triggering of large, potentially damaging events, for example the 2011 M5.7 Oklahoma event, thought to be the result of injection of waste water from fracking. The energy released in an induced earthquake is not limited to the energy introduced into the crust by the injection. Rather, the injection acts as a trigger for the release of energy that is already stored. The magnitude of the induced earthquake depends on properties of the existing faults such as size, location, state of stress and frictional behaviour. As with tectonic earthquakes, most of this information is not known: it is currently difficult, therefore, to provide meaningful constraints on the maximum probable magnitude at an injection site. Improving the quality of hazard assessment from induced seismicity relies, therefore, not only on advances in modelling fluid induced stress changes, but also developing physics based, stochastic models to explore uncertainties associated with unknown details of existing fault networks. (more…)

Other Geography/Geology Teaching Aids Available for Schools in Ireland

IGA SCHOOLS

TCD

Dr Ian Sanders of TCD has published an excellent booklet to help geography teachers explain the basic principles of Geology to their students.

In conjunction with this booklet, Dr. Sanders has rock sets of six common Irish rocks on offer to geography teachers.  He can be contacted at  – ISANDERS@tcd.ie.

 

GEOSCHOL

 

Dr Patrick Wyse Jackson, Curator of Trinity’s Geology Museum, along with Dr Matthew Parkes of the National Museum, and with assistance from the Ulster Museum, have together set up a website to assist teachers of geography / geology in Ireland:    www.geoschol.com

Geoschol.com  offers a number of very informative wall posters, such as:

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